Category Archives: Data Access

A Few Coding Patterns with the MongoDB C# API

In the February 2019 issue of MSDN Magazine (Exploring the Multi-Model Capability of Azure Cosmos DB Using Its API for MongoDB), my Data Points column explored working with the MongoDB model of Azure Cosmos DB using the mongocsharpdriver. I started by working against a local instance of MongoDB and then the Azure instance. But the column was a little bit long so I cut out a few extraneous sections . So I’m placing them here and linking to this blog post from the article.

In the article I used an IMongoCollection object to query and store data into the database. You must specify a type for the collection object to serialize and deserialize. In the article I typed the collection to my classes, e.g.,  Collection<Ship>. It’s also possible to type the collection generically to a BsonDocument. Here’s some information about that and a little bit of code.

Typing Collections to BsonDocument

Another path for mapping is to use a BsonDocument typed collection object that isn’t dependent on a particular type. This would allow you to have more generic methods. But it also means manually serializing and deserializing your objects, which is easy using ToBsonDocument for serializing:

var coll = db.GetCollection<BsonDocument> ("Ships");
coll.InsertOne (ship.ToBsonDocument());

Given that the documents have discriminators, you can then specify a type in your query to retrieve specific types although, by default, hierarchies don’t get accounted for. The article refers to documentation on polymorphism for the C# API. Here’s the link. Check  to learn how to properly implement polymorphism in more detail . The following code will only pull back documents where _t matches the configured discriminator for Ship into ships and for DecommissionedShip into dShips:

var coll = db.GetCollection<BsonDocument> ("Ships");
var ships = coll.AsQueryable().OfType<Ship>().ToList();
var dShips = coll.AsQueryable()
                  .OfType<DecommissionedShip>().ToList();

Encapsulating the MongoClient, Database and Collection

Specifying a typed collection instance repeatedly, as I did in the article demos, can become a drag. You could set them up in advance, for example in a class that acts as a context for interacting with the database, as shown here:

public class ExpanseContext
{
  public IMongoDatabase ExpanseDb { get; private set; }
  public IMongoCollection<Ship> Ships { get; private set; }
  public IMongoCollection<Character> Characters {get;private set;}
  public ExpanseContext()
  {
    ExpanseDb=new MongoClient().GetDatabase("ExpanseDatabase");
    Ships=ExpanseDb.GetCollection<Ship>("ships");
    Characters=ExpanseDb.GetCollection<Character>("ships"); 
  } 
}

This refactored code to insert a document is much more readable:

private static void InsertViaContext ()
{
  var context = new ExpanseContext ();
  var ship = new Ship { Name = "Agatha King" };
  context.Ships.InsertOne (ship);
}

Logging in EF Core 2.2 Has a Simpler Syntax–More like ASP.NET Core

Logging EF Core’s memory operations and SQL operations has evolved a few times since EF Core arrived. It takes advantage of the same underlying features that ASP.NET Core uses. If you are using ASP.NET Core, logging is baked in and it is really simple to turn it on for EF Core and add filtering. See Shawn Wildermuth’s blog post about EF Core logging in ASP.NET Core.

But if you aren’t using ASP.NET Core, it’s a little more complicated. Not terribly, but still there’s some extra work to do. It involves setting up an ILoggerFactory in your DbContext and defining any filters at the same time.

I wrote an article about this (with the focus being on taking advantage of the various available filters for EF Core logging) in MSDN Magazine earlier this …oh wait, it’s Jan 1, so I can say “last  year”.  Data Points – Logging SQL and Change-Tracking Events in EF Core. I also used it heavily in my EF Core 2 Getting Started course, EF Core 2:Mappings and EF Core 2.1: What’s New courses on Pluralsight. (Note that I’ve updated the sample code for the Getting Started course to EF Core 2.2 and put it on GitHub at github.com/julielerman/PluralsightEFCore2GettingStarted)

My article and courses were using Console apps to demonstrate EF Core behavior and therefore the ConsoleLoggerProvider to tie the logger to the console. Note that the Data Points article contains a lot of good details about the various types of filtering. So you can use the new syntax (below) to specify that there should be a filter, but be sure to read the article to learn about the flavors of filtering and what type of details you’ll be able to see based on the choices you make.

But the logging API has continued to evolve and is providing some of the same shortcuts that ASP.NET had created. And the ConsoleLoggerProvider has been deprecated. The API is not part of EF Core. It’s part of .NET Core. Both EF Core and ASP.NET Core use it.

If you are using EF Core 2.2, the syntax has changed (simplified) and it’s going to get even more streamlined in 3.0.

In fact, if you use the earlier syntax with 2.2, you’ll get a warning about the ConsoleLoggerProvider:

Obsolete(“This method is obsolete and will be removed in a future version. The recommended alternative is using LoggerFactory to configure filtering and ConsoleLoggerOptions to configure logging options.”)

For a point of comparison, here is an example of using theold syntax to turn on logging, only show logs related to database commands and only show messages that are tagged as “Information”.

EF Core 2.0 & 2.1 Logic

public static readonly LoggerFactory MyConsoleLoggerFactory
            = new LoggerFactory(new[] {
              new ConsoleLoggerProvider((category, level)
                => category == DbLoggerCategory.Database.Command.Name
               && level == LogLevel.Information, true) });

Once your logger factory field is defined in the context class you tell the DbContext to use it when configuring.

protected override void OnConfiguring
  (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
  var connectionString = 
    ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["WPFDatabase"].ToString();
  optionsBuilder
    .UseLoggerFactory(MyConsoleLoggerFactory)
    .EnableSensitiveDataLogging(true)
    .UseSqlServer(connectionString);
}

So it’s the creation of the logger factory whose syntax is a little convoluded. The newer API follows how ASP.NET Core lets you filter with an AddFilter method that takes the filters as parameters. No lambdas needed. Also configuring the filter is a separate bit of logic that tellig the logger that it should be tied to the console.

EF Core 2.2 Logic

With EF Core 2.2, you can set up the logger factory in the constructor or another method as long as it’s available when you are configuring the option builder. I’m creating it in a method then using that method as a parameter of UseLoggerFactory. I’m still filtering on showing only database commands and log details flagged as Information.

private ILoggerFactory GetLoggerFactory()
{
  IServiceCollection serviceCollection = new ServiceCollection();
  serviceCollection.AddLogging(builder =>
         builder.AddConsole()
                .AddFilter(DbLoggerCategory.Database.Command.Name, 
                           LogLevel.Information)); 
  return serviceCollection.BuildServiceProvider()
          .GetService<ILoggerFactory>();
}

and then I’m calling GetLoggerFactory() in the UseLogging method on the optionsbuilder:

optionsBuilder.UseLoggerFactory(GetLoggerFactory())

Packages and References

In order to use the AddConsole() method, you still have to use the Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Console package that the earlier ConsoleLoggerProvider was in. However, you do not need a using statement for the namespace (as you did for the ConsoleLoggerProvider).

EF Core’s IsConfigured and Logging

I got a little confused about some behavior today and finally realized my mistake so thought I would share it. This mostly happens in demo apps that I’m building that are not using  ASP.NET Core.

In these cases, I typically stick the DbContext provider configuration in the OnModelConfiguring method. For example, if I’m using SQLite, then I would specify that in the method as such:

protected override void OnConfiguring
 (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
   optionsBuilder.UseSqlite (@"Filename=Data/PubsTracker.db");
}

I also have been using the logging factory a lot. After defining it, I also configure it. I hadn’t thought much about where I was placig it so added it in randomly.

protected override void OnConfiguring 
  (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
  optionsBuilder.UseLoggerFactory (MyConsoleLoggerFactory);
  optionsBuilder.UseSqlite (@"Filename=Data/PubsTracker.db");
}

Then I added in some tests to had to avoid the SQLite provider if the InMemory provider was already configured, so I wrapped the UseSqlite method with a check to see if the options builder was already configured.

protected override void OnConfiguring
  (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
  optionsBuilder.UseLoggerFactory (MyConsoleLoggerFactory);
  if(!optionsBuilder.IsConfigured)
  {
    optionsBuilder.UseSqlite (@"Filename=Data/PubsTracker.db");
  }
}

But my logic wasn’t working. I was running some migrations but they were suddenly not recognizing the UseSqlite method. I’ve used this pattern so many times. It took me a while to realize what was going on. The UseLoggerFactory is a configuration!

I just had to move the UseLoggerFactory logic after the IsConfigured check and all was well.

This is one of those dumb things that seems so silly you wouldn’t imagine someone else would make such a mistake. But since it bit me, I thought it was worth sharing mostly for the sake of the next coder who is trying to solve the same problem.

Defining a Defining Query in EF Core 2.1

I have to cut out some text from a too-long article I’ve written for a magazine (links when it’s published), so here is a simple example of using the new ToQuery method for creating a defining query in EF Core 2.1 (currently in Preview 2).

ToQuery is associated with the new Query Type feature that allows you to use types that are not mapped to a table in the database and are therefore not true entities, don’t require a key and are not change tracked.

I’m starting with a simple model that includes these two entities, which are mapped to tables in my DbContext.

public class Team
    {
        public int TeamId { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string TwitterAlias { get; set; }
        public List Members { get; set; }
    }

    public class TeamMember
    {
        public int TeamMemberId { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Role { get; set; }
        public int TeamId { get; set; }
        public TimeSpan TypicalCommuteTime { get; private set; }
        public void CalculateCommuteTime (DateTime start, DateTime end)
        {
            TypicalCommuteTime = end.Subtract(start);
        }
    }

You’ll need to pre-define the type being used for the defining query, mine will have the Name and TypicalCommuteTime for the team member.

public class TeamCommute
{
   public TeamCommute(string name, TimeSpan commuteTime) 
  {
    Name = name;
    TypicalCommuteTime = commuteTime;
  }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public TimeSpan TypicalCommuteTime { get; set; }
}

You can define queries directly in OnModelBuilding using either raw sql with FromSql or a LINQ query inside a new method called ToQuery. Here’s an example of using a Query type with a defining query and Linq:

modelBuilder.Query<TeamCommute>()   .ToQuery(() => 
   TeamMembers.Select(m => new TeamCommute( m.Name, m.TypicalCommuteTime ) )

With this query defined on the TeamCommute class, you can now use that in queries in your code for example:

var commutes = context.Query<TeamCommute>().ToList();

Keep I mind that you can’t define both a ToQuery and a ToView mapping on the same type.

New Pluralsight Course! EF Core 2: Getting Started

I’ve recently published my 19th course on Pluralsight.com: Entity Framework Core 2: Getting Started.

It’s 2hrs 40 minutes long and focuses on the basics.

This is using EF Core 2.0.1 in Visual Studio 2017.

Future plans: I’ve begun working on an intermediate level course to follow up and have others in the pipeline…such as a course to cover features of EF Core 2.1 when it gets released (I will wait until it has RTMd for stability) and other advanced topics. I am also planning to do a cross-platform version using VS Code on macOS because that’s my fave these days.

If you are not a Pluralsight subscriber, send me a note and I can give you a 30-day trial so you can watch the course. Be warned: the trial is akin to a gateway drug to becoming a subscriber.

Here is the table of contents for the course:

Introducing a New, Lighter Weight Version of EF   32m 40s
Introduction and Overview
What Is Entity Framework Core?
Where You Can Build and Run Apps with EF Core
How EF Core Works
The Path From EF6 to EF Core to EF Core
EF Core 2 New Features
Looking Ahead to EF Core 2.1 and Beyond
Review and Resources

Creating a Data Model and Database with EF Core    42m 36s
Introduction and Overview
Setting up the Solution
Adding EF Core with the NuGet Package Manager
Creating the Data Model with EF Core
Specifying the Data Provider and Connection String
Understanding EF Core Migrations
Adding Your First Migration
Inspecting Your First Migration
Using Migrations to Script or Directly Create the Database
Recreating the Model in .NET Core
Adding Many-to-many and One-to-one Relationships
Reverse Engineering an Existing Database
Review and Resources

Interacting with Your EF Core Data Model 34m 11s
Introduction and Overview
Getting EF Core to Output SQL Logs
Inserting Simple Objects
Batching Commands When Saving
Querying Simple Objects
Filtering Data in Queries
Updating Simple Objects
Disconnected Updates
Deleting Objects with EF Core
Review and Resources

Querying and Saving Related Data   20m 49s
Introduction and Overview
Inserting Related Data
Eager Loading Related Data
Projecting Related Data in Queries
Using Related Data to Filter Objects
Modifying Related Data
Review and Resources

Using EF Core in Your Applications    30m 52s
Introduction and Overview
EF Core on the Desktop or Device
The Desktop Application: Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF)
Creating the WPF Application
Walking Through the WPF Data Access
EF Core in ASP.NET Core MVC
Adding Related Data into the MVC App
Coding the MVC App’s Relationships
Review and Resources

The Secret to Running EF Core 2.0 Migrations from a NET Core or NET Standard Class Library

I have had two people that watched my Pluralsight EF Core Getting Started course (which will soon be joined by an EF Core 2: Getting Started course) ask the same question, which mystified me at first.

The were running migrations commands which caused the project to compile, but the commands did not do anything. For example, add-migration didn’t add a migration file. get-dbcontext did not return any information. The most curious part was there was no error message! I was able to duplicate the problem.

With EF6 it was possible to use migrations from a class library with no exe project in sight. EF Core migrations can run from a .NET Framework or .NET Core project but not .NET Standard. It needs a runtime. A common workaround is that even if you haven’t gotten to the UI part of your app yet, to just add a .NET Core console app project to the solution, add the EF Core Design Nuget package to it and set it as the startup project. But it’s still possible to do this without adding in a dummy project.

We already knew about the multi-targetting fix which solved an error when you try to run migrations from a .NET Standard library. But even with that fix in place, we were getting the mysterious nothingness.

The answer to the question was buried in a GitHub issue and in comments for the Migrations document in the EF Core docs. This same solution solved a problem I was having when trying to use migrations in a UWP app (again, not .NET Core or .NET Framework) that used a separate class library to host its DbContext.

I’m writing this blog post to surface the solution until it is resolved.

The solution that we used with EF Core 1.0 in order to run migrations from a .NET Standard library was to multi-target for .Net Standard (so you can use the library in a few places) and .NET Core (so you can run migrations).

That means replacing

<PropertyGroup>       
  <TargetFramework>netstandard20</TargetFramework>
</PropertyGroup>

with

<PropertyGroup> 
  <TargetFrameworks>netcoreapp2.0;netstandard2.0</TargetFrameworks>
</PropertyGroup>

Notice that the attribute name is now plural and there is a semi-colon between the two SDKs.

But there’s one more secret which is not in the documentation.

For .NET Standard 2.0 (and EF Core 2.0), you also need to add the following to csproj.

<PropertyGroup>
 <GenerateRuntimeConfigurationFiles>true</GenerateRuntimeConfigurationFiles></PropertyGroup>

Now with the DbContext project set as the startup and ensuring that the package manager console (or command line) are pointing to the same project, your migration commands will work.

Thanks to Christopher Moffat who found the solution in the GitHub issues and shared it in the comments on the EF Core Package Manager Console Tools document.


Screenshot for Tony ..see my comment in reply to your comment below.

Another Use Case for DbContext.Add in EFCore (and a DDD win)

If you are like me and design your classes following Domain-Driven Design principals , you may find yourself with code like this for controlling how objects get added to collections in the root entity.

public class Samurai {

  public Samurai (string name) : this()
  {
     Name = name;
  }

  private Samurai ()
  {
    _quotes=new List<Quote>();
  }

  public int Id { get; private set; }
  public string Name { get; private set; }
  private readonly List _quotes = new List ()
  private IEnumerable Quotes => _quotes.ToList ();
  public void AddQuote (string quoteText) {
      var newQuote=new Quote(quoteText,Id);
      _quotes.Add (newQuote);
  }

I have a fully encapsulated collection of Quotes. The only way to add a new quote is through the AddQuote method. You can’t just call Samura.Quotes.Add(myquote).

Additionally, because I want to control how developers interact with my API, there is no DbSet for Quotes. You have to do all of your queries and updates via context.Samurais.

A big downside to this is that if I have a new quote and I know the ID of the samurai, I have to first query for the samurai and then use the AddQuote. That really bugs me. I just want to create a new quote, push in the Samurai’s ID value and save it. And that requires either raw SQL or a DbSet<Quote>. I don’t like either option. Raw SQL is a hack in this case and DbSet<Quote> will open my API up to potential misuse.

I was thinking about this problem while laying in bed this morning (admit it, that’s the first thing you do when you wake up, too, right?) and had an idea.

In EF Core, we can now add objects directly to the context without going through the DbSet. The context can figure out what DbSet the entity belongs to and apply the right info to the change tracker. I thought this was handy for being able to call

myContext.AddRange(personobjectA, accountobjectB, productObjectC);

Although I haven’t run into a good use case for leveraging that yet.

What occurred to me is that if DbContext.Add is  using  reflection, maybe EF Core can find a private DbSet.

So I added a private DbSet to my DbContext class:

private DbSet<Quote> Quotes { get; set; }
 And tried out this code (notice I’m using context.Add, not context.Quotes.Add):
static void AddQuoteToSamurai () 
{
  using (var context =newSamuraiContext ()) 
  {
    var quote=newQuote("Voila",1);
    context.Add(quote);
    context.SaveChanges();
  }
}
And it worked! But this isn’t complete yet. I’m breaking my rule of ensuring that only my aggregate root can manage quotes. So this is “dangerous” code from my DDD perspective. However, I was happy to know that EF Core would support this capability.
Currently, Samurai.AddQuote does not have any additional logic to be performed on the quote. What if I were to add in a “RemoveBadWords” rule before a quote can get added?
public void AddQuote (string quoteText) 
{
 Utilities.RemoveBadWords(quoteText);
 var newQuote=new Quote(quoteText,Id);
  _quotes.Add (newQuote);
}
 Now I have an important reason to use Samurai to do the deed. I can add a second, static AddQuote method that also takes an int. Because it’s static, it’s a pass through method.
public static Quote AddQuote(string quoteText,int samuraiId)
{
  Utilities.RemoveBadWords(quoteText); 
  var newQuote=newQuote(quoteText,samuraiId);
  return newQuote;
}

This works and now I don’t have to have an instance of Samurai to use it:

staticvoid AddQuoteToSamurai () 
{
  using (var context =newSamuraiContext ()) {
    context.Add(Samurai.AddQuote("static voila",1));
    context.SaveChanges();
}

One thing I was worried about was if I had an instance of Samurai and tried to use this to add a quote to a different samurai. That would break the aggregate root…it’s job is to manage its own quotes only. It shouldn’t know about other Samurais.

But .NET protects me from that. I can’t call the static method from an instance of Samurai.

I still think that there’s a little bit of code smell from a DDD perspective about having this static, pass-through method in an aggregate root so will have to investigate that (or wait for any unhappy DDDers in my comments). But for now I am happy that I can avoid having to query for an instance of Samurai just to do this one task.

First Foray into .NET Core 2.0

I have to start somewhere so I started wtih super baby steps. Downloading the .NET Core 2 nightly build and trying to create a simple console app. Right away I failed miserably. The reason? The nightly builds have already jumped the shark! They are working on 2.1.0 and I accidentally grabbed that. And that was a little too bleeding edge for me.

There is a docker image that you can use quite easily but I wanted to try CLI, VS Code and Visual Studio. Therefore I wanted to just install the bits right on my machine.

What I’ll show you are  my first tests I did on macOS and on Windows 10. I like to do this just to make sure things are actually running properly. Note that on macOS, I just installed this new version directly on my machine where I have other versions of .NET Core. Key is that there is no production work on there dependent on other versions, so I won’t mess up anything important. The versions can live side by side. It’s just that for someone like me who “knows enough to be dangerous”, it’s easy to get tangled up with the versions even though I know tricks like creating a local nuget.config file and also specifying a version in global.json. On Windows, however, I am using a clean VM that has no other versions of .NET on it. That’s the smart way anyway. Although I did try the not smart way of installig it on my machine that already has all kinds of versions of all kinds of frameworks on it and even with my versioning tricks, I could not get 2.0.0 to do a restore or build.

I mentioned above that I originally downloaded the wrong version of the SDK. (Note that the typical SDK install also includes the runtime….so I got the wrong versoins of both. You can read the gory details of that in this GitHub issue which I kept updating as I sorted the problem out.) I want to stick with .NET Core 2.0.0. The installer for that is tucked away in a branch of github.com/dotnet/cli rather than grabbing the absolute latest from the master. Instead go to https://github.com/dotnet/cli/tree/release/2.0.0. There is a solid 2.0.0 version — 2.0.0-preview2-006391. That’s the one I’m using on Windows and macOS.

2017-06-11_12-23-16.jpg

Make Sure NuGet Knows Where to Find Packages

You can update your global NuGet.Config before creating projects. Alternatively, you can create a project and then add a local NuGet.config file to it.

On Mac, the global config file at [user]/.nuget/NuGet. Here s a screenshot if like me, macOS is not your primary platform and you still struggle with these things.

2017-06-11_12-32-15.jpg

In Windows, it’s at %APPDATA%\NuGet\.

I keep a link to the “Configuring NuGet behavior” doc handy for when I forget where to find that.

I added these two keys to my PackageSources section:

<add key="nuget.org" value="https://api.nuget.org/v3/index.json" protocolVersion="3" />

<add key="dotnet-core" value="https://dotnet.myget.org/F/dotnet-core/api/v3/index.json"/>

 Now it’s time to create a project

I’m on the Mac, so, to Terminal we will go.

I’ve created a new folder called EFCore20 – I know this is .NET Core, but eventually I plan to add in EF Core 2.0 as well.
My plan is to create a .NET Core console app (this will rely on netcoreapp2.0) and a library. The libray will be based on the netstandard2.0 library . That means its a library I’ll be able to use from a huge variety of apps, including .NET 4.6.1 based apps. EF Core 2.0 will also rely on .NET Standard 2.0, so any app or API that can consume netstandard, can also consume EF Core 2.0. Read more about that in this EF Core 2.0 announcement on GitHub.

I created one folder for each inside the EFCore20 folder:

netcore2console
netstandard2lib

Then I cd’d into the netcore2console app to create that app with the command:

dotnet new console.
That’s all it takes. This creates a tiny little Hello World app. The dotnet new command will also perform a dotnet restore after creating the files. This is the first moment you will see if things are wokring again. If the restore fails, it will tell you immediately.
This is the message I got when had things misaligned:
Error message: error MSB4236: The SDK ‘Microsoft.NET.Sdk’ specified could not be found.
The “specified” SDK is the currently installed version of whatever SDK you are referencing. In my case, the default for dotnet enw console is “dotnetcore” with the version being whatever version is installed.
Most likely the problem is that  you haven’t provided the correct URI for dotnet to find the proper NuGet packages.
If you don’t want to mess with the global config, you can create a local NuGet.config file in the folder with the app. In it’s entirety, it would look like:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
 <configuration>
  <packageSources>
   <addkey="nuget.org"value="https://api.nuget.org/v3/index.json"protocolVersion="3"/>
   <addkey="dotnet-core"value="https://dotnet.myget.org/F/dotnet-core/api/v3/index.json"/>
  </packageSources>
</configuration>
Even though dotnet new will call restore, I like to call
dotnet restore
explicitly. (Control freak)
If it restored correctly, then the next step for validation is
dotnet build
And hopefully that gives you no errors as well. It shouldn’t.
Finally,
dotnet run
should result in spitting out
Hello World!
And now I know it’s working. Silly little bit but I want to verify this before I waste my time writing a bunh of code that isn’t going to run because I don’t even have .NET Core installed properly.
Another point of interest is what files were created by dotnet new console.
It’s easier to see them if I open them up in Visual Studio Code which I can do by typing
code .
There are only 2 files. The csproj with the project metadata and a program file.  The csproj file says that the target framework is netcoreapp2.0.

2017-06-11_14-09-46

The program file just spits out Hello World when it starts up.
2017-06-11_14-10-17
Here is a screenshot of all of the steps at the command line from dotnet new console to the Hello World! output including my extra dotnet restore. Another thing I like about the explicit restore is that it’s showing me more detailed info about the restore.
2017-06-11_14-03-19
Next I want to make sure I can get a .NET Standard library also working.
Still in the terminal (or console or PS if you’re on Windows), I now get into the 2nd sub folder, EF Core2/netstandardlibrary. dotnet new library defaults to using netstandard for the library. So that makes it easy.
dotnet new library
The library is created and the packages it needs are restored.
Here are the default contents of this new library, again, shown in VS Code.
Ntice that its csproj says the target framework is netstandard2.0.2017-06-11_14-16-09
And there’s an empty class file.
2017-06-11_14-18-12
I’ll modify the class to add a public method that returns a string: “Why, Hello There!”.
2017-06-11_14-22-01

Now I’ll go into the csproj for the console app and give it a project reference to the library. The intellisense does not (yet?) help me with this and my memory sucks*, so I head to Nate McMaster’s handy project.json to csproj mind mapper aka Project.json to MSBuild conversion guide to remind myself the syntax of a project reference. I add this below the property group section in the console app’s csproj file

 

<ItemGroup>
  <ProjectReference Include="..\netstandard2lib\netstandard2lib.csproj"/>
</ItemGroup>
Running dotnet restore and dotnet build again will help identify if you’ve got a typo in there. I often do.
Now I’ll modify the Program.cs file to also call output the resultls of caling the HiYa method from my library:
2017-06-11_14-31-39

And then back out to my terminal window (though I can also do it inside VS Code’s built-in terminal). I dotnet build the library and then change to the console folder. Rebuild that and run it and …voila

  netcore2console dotnet run

Hello World!

Why, Hello There!

  netcore2console

So now I know that .NET Core 2 (preview from a nightly build) is running properly on my machine and that I can create and use a .NET Standard 2.0 library. That means I can go ahead and confidently start creating a .NET Standard 2.0 library to host some EF Core 2.0 logic.

I also repeated this entire thing on my Windows machine. Not only does that let me know I can use this version of .NET Core there, but I will also do some work from within Visual Studio with the .NET Core 2.0 preview.

*(duh, I should just make myself a snippet in VS Code!)

What’s in that sqlservr.sh file on the mssql-sqlserver-linux docker image anyway?

Update June 3, 2017: The team has revised the docker image and the bash file is gone, presumably with its logic broken up in to various locations. Still I’m glad I grabbed this when I did to satisfy my curiosity!

Microsoft has created 4 official Docker images for SQL Server: SQL Server for Linux, SQL Server Developer Edition, SQL Server Express and (windows) SQL Server vNext) . They can be found on the Docker hub (e.g. https://hub.docker.com/r/microsoft/mssql-server-linux/) and there is also a Github repository for them at github.com/Microsoft/mssql-docker. Some of the files that go along with that image are not on Github. The Dockerfile files for each image run some type of startup script. The Windows images have a PowerShell script called start.ps1. You can see those in the Github repo. The Linux image runs a bash file called sqlservr.sh. That’s not included in the repo though and I was curious what it did.

Note: I wrote a blog post about using the SQL Server for Linux container (Mashup: SQL Server on Linux in Docker on a Mac with Visual Studio Code and I’m also writing an article about using the containers for my July MSDN Magazine Data Points column (watch this space).

Still a bit of a bash noob, I learned how to read a file from a docker container on ..you guessed it…StackOverflow.  Following those instructions, I created a snapshot of my running container

MySqlServerLinuImage git:(master) docker commit juliesqllinux  mysnapshot

sha256:9b552a1e24df7652af0c6c265ae5e2d7cb7832586c431d4b480c30663ab713f0

and ran the snapshot with bash:

  MySqlServerLinuImage git:(master) docker run -t -i mysnapshot bin/bash

[email protected]:/# 

Then at the new prompt (#), used ls to get the listing

[email protected]:/# ls

SqlCmdScript.sql  SqlCmdStartup.sh  bin  boot  dev  entrypoint.sh  etc  home  install.sh  lib  lib64  media  mnt  opt  proc  root  run  sbin  srv  sys  tmp  usr  var

then navigated to  folder where the bash file is and listed its contents:

[email protected]:/opt/mssql/bin# ls

compress-dump.sh  generate-core.sh  mssql-conf  paldumper  sqlpackage  sqlservr  sqlservr.sh

Once I was there I used the cat command to list out the contents of the sqlservr.sh file and see what it does. Here is the secret sauce in case, like me, you NEED to know what’s going on under the covers!

[email protected]:/opt/mssql/bin# cat sqlservr.sh 

#!/bin/bash

#

# Microsoft(R) SQL Server(R) launch script for Docker

#

ACCEPT_EULA=${ACCEPT_EULA:-}

SA_PASSWORD=${SA_PASSWORD:-}

#COLLATION=${COLLATION:-SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS}

have_sa_password=""

#have_collation=""

sqlservr_setup_prefix=""

configure=""

reconfigure=""

# Check system memory

#

let system_memory="$(awk '/MemTotal/ {print $2}' /proc/meminfo) / 1024"

if [ $system_memory -lt 3250 ]; then

    echo "ERROR: This machine must have at least 3.25 gigabytes of memory to install Microsoft(R) SQL Server(R)."

    exit 1

fi

# Create system directories

#

mkdir -p /var/opt/mssql/data

mkdir -p /var/opt/mssql/etc

mkdir -p /var/opt/mssql/log

# Check the EULA

#

if [ "$ACCEPT_EULA" != "Y" ] && [ "$ACCEPT_EULA" != "y" ]; then

 echo "ERROR: You must accept the End User License Agreement before this container" > /dev/stderr

 echo "can start. The End User License Agreement can be found at " > /dev/stderr

 echo "http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=746388." > /dev/stderr

 echo ""

 echo "Set the environment variable ACCEPT_EULA to 'Y' if you accept the agreement." > /dev/stderr

 exit 1

fi

# Configure SQL engine

#

if [ ! -f /var/opt/mssql/data/master.mdf ]; then

 configure=1

 if [ ! -z "$SA_PASSWORD" ] || [ -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/sa_password ]; then

 have_sa_password=1

 fi

# if [ ! -z "$COLLATION" ] || [ -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/collation ]; then

# have_collation=1

# fi

 if [ -z "$have_sa_password" ]; then

        echo "ERROR: The system administrator password is not configured. You can set the" > /dev/stderr

        echo "password via environment variable (SA_PASSWORD) or configuration file" > /dev/stderr

        echo "(/var/opt/mssql/etc/sa_password)." > /dev/stderr

 exit 1

 fi

fi

# If user wants to reconfigure, set reconfigure flag

#

if [ -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/reconfigure ]; then

 reconfigure=1

fi

# If we need to configure or reconfigure, run through configuration

# logic

#

if [ "$configure" == "1" ] || [ "$reconfigure" == "1" ]; then

 sqlservr_setup_options=""

# if [ -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/collation ]; then

# sqlservr_setup_options+="-q $(cat /var/opt/mssql/etc/collation)"

# else

# if [ ! -z "$COLLATION" ]; then

# sqlservr_setup_options+="-q $COLLATION "

# fi

# fi

 set +e

 cd /var/opt/mssql

 echo 'Configuring Microsoft(R) SQL Server(R)...'

 if [ -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/sa_password ]; then

 SQLSERVR_SA_PASSWORD_FILE=/var/opt/mssql/etc/sa_password /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr --setup $sqlservr_setup_options 2>&1 > /var/opt/mssql/log/setup-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M%S).log

 elif [ ! -z "$SA_PASSWORD" ]; then

 SQLSERVR_SA_PASSWORD_FILE=<(echo -n "$SA_PASSWORD") /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr --setup $sqlservr_setup_options 2>&1 > /var/opt/mssql/log/setup-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M%S).log

 else

 if [ ! -z '$sqlservr_setup_options' ]; then

 /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr --setup $sqlservr_setup_options 2>&1 > /var/opt/mssql/log/setup-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M%S).log

 fi

 fi

 retcode=$?

 if [ $retcode != 0 ]; then

 echo "Microsoft(R) SQL Server(R) setup failed with error code $retcode. Please check the setup log in /var/opt/mssql/log for more information." > /dev/stderr

 exit 1

 fi

 set -e

 rm -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/reconfigure

 rm -f /var/opt/mssql/etc/sa_password

 echo "Configuration complete."

fi

# Start SQL Server

#

exec /opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr $*