Getting the SQL Server 2019 for Linux CTP2.0 Docker Image

If you are used to pulling the mssql-server images from the microsoft repository, e.g.,

docker pull microsoft/mssql-server

that won’t work for the 2019 CTP.

I was able to repull (aka update) using the former repository, but that wasn’t working for the CTP whose tag is vNext-CTP2.0-ubuntu.

I finally noticed the new docker pull command on the docker hub page for the image

It says: docker pull mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server

So the command for pulling the CTP using it’s tag is as follows:

docker pull mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:vNext-CTP2.0-ubuntu

 

Grateful for the 16th MVP Award from Microsoft

 

15 years ago, July 1, 2003, I got a surprise in the mail. An envelope with this sheet of paper welcoming me to the Microsoft MVP program for the things I had done in the community in the past year. Believe it or not, this first award was triggered via Microsoft Academics because one of the things I’d been doing with INETA was working with college students.

With that piece of paper fresh out of the envelope, I jumped in my car and drove 15 miles to the job site where my husband was working on a roof, made him come down from the roof so I could show him. I was that excited and surprised. Even if the letter had not been completely out of the blue, had someone contacted me to fill out a form as the MVPs do these days, I am confident I would have been just as surprised and excited.

I’ve been honored to be awarded every July 1 since then for various things I do to try to shorten the learning curve for other programmers by sharing what I’ve learned. I don’t take the award for granted. I just follow my heart and do what I want to do and if it happens to be what they are looking for when the assessments are being done, then I’m grateful for that particular recognition.

I know it was a hard week for a lot of long term MVPs who were not being re-awarded this year and for the MVP leads (aka Community Program Managers (aka CMPs)) who made personal calls to each and every one of those MVPs to try to let them know as gently as possible. Given that, I’m extra grateful to continue to be part of the program for the July 2018 – June 2019 period.

My First Newsletter: New Course, Pluralsight Discount, Workshops & More

I recently decided it was time to start a newsletter to be sure people who are interested don’t miss out on things like new Pluralsight courses or articles that I’ve published, conferences I’m speaking at and even workshops that I’m teaching. I figure with 26K twitter followers, there might be a few people interested.

Read the June newsletter

Subscribe to my newsletter

I just sent out the first newsletter yesterday. Here are some highlights:

 

 

 

Pluralsight Subscriptions On Sale This Week!

Pluralsight is having a summer sale on annual subscriptions – $100 off (i.e. $199 for an entire year’s access to the entire library) which is a pretty amazing price for what you’re getting. Heck the regular price of $299 for a full year is amazing when you compare it to the cost of almost any type of training from the expert-authors). Anyway, I don’t have to tell you, you already know!

The $199 price is for new subscriptions, renewing  existing subscriptions and even converting from a monthly subscription!

EF Core’s IsConfigured and Logging

I got a little confused about some behavior today and finally realized my mistake so thought I would share it. This mostly happens in demo apps that I’m building that are not using  ASP.NET Core.

In these cases, I typically stick the DbContext provider configuration in the OnModelConfiguring method. For example, if I’m using SQLite, then I would specify that in the method as such:

protected override void OnConfiguring
 (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
   optionsBuilder.UseSqlite (@"Filename=Data/PubsTracker.db");
}

I also have been using the logging factory a lot. After defining it, I also configure it. I hadn’t thought much about where I was placig it so added it in randomly.

protected override void OnConfiguring 
  (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
  optionsBuilder.UseLoggerFactory (MyConsoleLoggerFactory);
  optionsBuilder.UseSqlite (@"Filename=Data/PubsTracker.db");
}

Then I added in some tests to had to avoid the SQLite provider if the InMemory provider was already configured, so I wrapped the UseSqlite method with a check to see if the options builder was already configured.

protected override void OnConfiguring
  (DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
{
  optionsBuilder.UseLoggerFactory (MyConsoleLoggerFactory);
  if(!optionsBuilder.IsConfigured)
  {
    optionsBuilder.UseSqlite (@"Filename=Data/PubsTracker.db");
  }
}

But my logic wasn’t working. I was running some migrations but they were suddenly not recognizing the UseSqlite method. I’ve used this pattern so many times. It took me a while to realize what was going on. The UseLoggerFactory is a configuration!

I just had to move the UseLoggerFactory logic after the IsConfigured check and all was well.

This is one of those dumb things that seems so silly you wouldn’t imagine someone else would make such a mistake. But since it bit me, I thought it was worth sharing mostly for the sake of the next coder who is trying to solve the same problem.

Defining a Defining Query in EF Core 2.1

I have to cut out some text from a too-long article I’ve written for a magazine (links when it’s published), so here is a simple example of using the new ToQuery method for creating a defining query in EF Core 2.1 (currently in Preview 2).

ToQuery is associated with the new Query Type feature that allows you to use types that are not mapped to a table in the database and are therefore not true entities, don’t require a key and are not change tracked.

I’m starting with a simple model that includes these two entities, which are mapped to tables in my DbContext.

public class Team
    {
        public int TeamId { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string TwitterAlias { get; set; }
        public List Members { get; set; }
    }

    public class TeamMember
    {
        public int TeamMemberId { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Role { get; set; }
        public int TeamId { get; set; }
        public TimeSpan TypicalCommuteTime { get; private set; }
        public void CalculateCommuteTime (DateTime start, DateTime end)
        {
            TypicalCommuteTime = end.Subtract(start);
        }
    }

You’ll need to pre-define the type being used for the defining query, mine will have the Name and TypicalCommuteTime for the team member.

public class TeamCommute
{
   public TeamCommute(string name, TimeSpan commuteTime) 
  {
    Name = name;
    TypicalCommuteTime = commuteTime;
  }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public TimeSpan TypicalCommuteTime { get; set; }
}

You can define queries directly in OnModelBuilding using either raw sql with FromSql or a LINQ query inside a new method called ToQuery. Here’s an example of using a Query type with a defining query and Linq:

modelBuilder.Query<TeamCommute>()   .ToQuery(() => 
   TeamMembers.Select(m => new TeamCommute( m.Name, m.TypicalCommuteTime ) )

With this query defined on the TeamCommute class, you can now use that in queries in your code for example:

var commutes = context.Query<TeamCommute>().ToList();

Keep I mind that you can’t define both a ToQuery and a ToView mapping on the same type.

New Pluralsight Course! EF Core 2: Getting Started

I’ve recently published my 19th course on Pluralsight.com: Entity Framework Core 2: Getting Started.

It’s 2hrs 40 minutes long and focuses on the basics.

This is using EF Core 2.0.1 in Visual Studio 2017.

Future plans: I’ve begun working on an intermediate level course to follow up and have others in the pipeline…such as a course to cover features of EF Core 2.1 when it gets released (I will wait until it has RTMd for stability) and other advanced topics. I am also planning to do a cross-platform version using VS Code on macOS because that’s my fave these days.

If you are not a Pluralsight subscriber, send me a note and I can give you a 30-day trial so you can watch the course. Be warned: the trial is akin to a gateway drug to becoming a subscriber.

Here is the table of contents for the course:

Introducing a New, Lighter Weight Version of EF   32m 40s
Introduction and Overview
What Is Entity Framework Core?
Where You Can Build and Run Apps with EF Core
How EF Core Works
The Path From EF6 to EF Core to EF Core
EF Core 2 New Features
Looking Ahead to EF Core 2.1 and Beyond
Review and Resources

Creating a Data Model and Database with EF Core    42m 36s
Introduction and Overview
Setting up the Solution
Adding EF Core with the NuGet Package Manager
Creating the Data Model with EF Core
Specifying the Data Provider and Connection String
Understanding EF Core Migrations
Adding Your First Migration
Inspecting Your First Migration
Using Migrations to Script or Directly Create the Database
Recreating the Model in .NET Core
Adding Many-to-many and One-to-one Relationships
Reverse Engineering an Existing Database
Review and Resources

Interacting with Your EF Core Data Model 34m 11s
Introduction and Overview
Getting EF Core to Output SQL Logs
Inserting Simple Objects
Batching Commands When Saving
Querying Simple Objects
Filtering Data in Queries
Updating Simple Objects
Disconnected Updates
Deleting Objects with EF Core
Review and Resources

Querying and Saving Related Data   20m 49s
Introduction and Overview
Inserting Related Data
Eager Loading Related Data
Projecting Related Data in Queries
Using Related Data to Filter Objects
Modifying Related Data
Review and Resources

Using EF Core in Your Applications    30m 52s
Introduction and Overview
EF Core on the Desktop or Device
The Desktop Application: Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF)
Creating the WPF Application
Walking Through the WPF Data Access
EF Core in ASP.NET Core MVC
Adding Related Data into the MVC App
Coding the MVC App’s Relationships
Review and Resources

The Secret to Running EF Core 2.0 Migrations from a NET Core or NET Standard Class Library

I have had two people that watched my Pluralsight EF Core Getting Started course (which will soon be joined by an EF Core 2: Getting Started course) ask the same question, which mystified me at first.

The were running migrations commands which caused the project to compile, but the commands did not do anything. For example, add-migration didn’t add a migration file. get-dbcontext did not return any information. The most curious part was there was no error message! I was able to duplicate the problem.

With EF6 it was possible to use migrations from a class library with no exe project in sight. EF Core migrations can run from a .NET Framework or .NET Core project but not .NET Standard. It needs a runtime. A common workaround is that even if you haven’t gotten to the UI part of your app yet, to just add a .NET Core console app project to the solution, add the EF Core Design Nuget package to it and set it as the startup project. But it’s still possible to do this without adding in a dummy project.

We already knew about the multi-targetting fix which solved an error when you try to run migrations from a .NET Standard library. But even with that fix in place, we were getting the mysterious nothingness.

The answer to the question was buried in a GitHub issue and in comments for the Migrations document in the EF Core docs. This same solution solved a problem I was having when trying to use migrations in a UWP app (again, not .NET Core or .NET Framework) that used a separate class library to host its DbContext.

I’m writing this blog post to surface the solution until it is resolved.

The solution that we used with EF Core 1.0 in order to run migrations from a .NET Standard library was to multi-target for .Net Standard (so you can use the library in a few places) and .NET Core (so you can run migrations).

That means replacing

<PropertyGroup>       
  <TargetFramework>netstandard20</TargetFramework>
</PropertyGroup>

with

<PropertyGroup> 
  <TargetFrameworks>netcoreapp2.0;netstandard2.0</TargetFrameworks>
</PropertyGroup>

Notice that the attribute name is now plural and there is a semi-colon between the two SDKs.

But there’s one more secret which is not in the documentation.

For .NET Standard 2.0 (and EF Core 2.0), you also need to add the following to csproj.

<PropertyGroup>
 <GenerateRuntimeConfigurationFiles>true</GenerateRuntimeConfigurationFiles></PropertyGroup>

Now with the DbContext project set as the startup and ensuring that the package manager console (or command line) are pointing to the same project, your migration commands will work.

Thanks to Christopher Moffat who found the solution in the GitHub issues and shared it in the comments on the EF Core Package Manager Console Tools document.


Screenshot for Tony ..see my comment in reply to your comment below.