Tag Archives: visual studio

New Pluralsight Course: Interacting with SQL Server data in Visual Studio Code on Win, Mac, Linux

imageMy latest course on Pluralsight, Cross-platform SQL Server Management for Developers using VS Code, went live earlier this month (just as I was about to hop on a plane for 2 weeks of conference travel!)

This is a course on a Visual Studio Code extension that I enjoy using so much that I wanted to share it with you. It is the mssql extension which lets you interact with SQL Server in a fairly rich way that belies the lightness of the IDE which it extends. Because VS Code is cross-platform, so are all of its extensions. So you can use this while you are coding on Windows, Mac or Linux and want to do some basic interaction with a SQL Server database.

As SQL Server examples, I used SQL Server LocalDb on Windows, SQL Server for Linux in a Docker container on a Mac and Azure SQL in the cloud. The course starts not only y showing you how to install VS Code (and some VS Code basics) and the extension but also by walking you through how to set up each of the database servers. That means it also has a lesson on Docker , installing and running an image as well as a quick start on creating a new SQL database in the Azure portal.

Once everything is set up, I dig through the features and functionality of the mssql extension. And I turned over ever possible stone to make sure you don’t miss helpful features which is the norm if you just start using such a tool without any preparation.

The course is mostly demos and very light on Powerpoint slides and I do work in Windows, on my Macbook and even in a Linux virtual machine.

imageWhat I’m also proud about this course is that if you’ve never used VS Code before, you’ll learn how to get around this amazing editor. If you’ve never used Docker before, I provide a really helpful and gentle introduction and you’ll be able to work with it. I had some great support from the team responsible for this extension as they were so happy to have this kind of attention paid to it.

So whatever language you code in, whatever O/S you work on, if you are using SQL Server (or interested in using it), this course should be a great help in mastering this very handy extension!

Below is the Table of Contents for the course.

If you need a 30-day free trial to the Pluralsight library so that you can watch this, send me a note!


Module 1: Introducing and Installing VS Code and the mssql Extension

In this module you’ll get a short introduction to the cross-platform and free developer IDE, Visual Studio Code and its mssql extension, The extension allow you to perform some key interactions with a SQL Server database without leaving the IDE. You’ll also walk through installing both the IDE and the extension on Windows and macOS

  • Module and Course Overview
  • Introducing Visual Studio Code and the mssql Extension
  • Installing Visual Studio Code on Windows
  • Installing Visual Studio Code on macOS
  • Introducing Visual Studio Code’s Coding Super Powers
  • Installing the mssql Extension in VS Code

 

 

Module 2: Preparing SQL Server for Any Platform, Locally and in the Cloud

In this module, you’ll learn how to set up a variety of SQL Servers. All of them are quick to install. You’ll learn to install SQL Server LocalDb on Windows, create an Azure SQL Database in the cloud and use a Docker image of SQL Server for Linux to quickly spin up SQL Server in a container on macOS. This will ensure that you have a SQL Server database to interact with in the rest of the course.

  • SQL Server LocalDB: The Simplest SQL Server
  • Setting Up an Azure SQL Database in the Cloud
  • Verifying the New Azure SQL Database
  • Setting Up the Last Details of Your Azure SQL Database
  • Using a Docker Container to Host SQL Server for Linux on Any O/S
  • Installing Docker and Getting the SQL Server Container Running
  • Verifying the Containerized Database
  • Understanding Persistence and Lack of Persistence in Containers
  • Pulling a Custom Image with the Sample Database in Place

 

Module 3: Connecting to the Various SQL Servers From Various Platforms

In this module, you’ll learn the ins and outs of connecting to a variety of local, cloud and containerized SQL Servers with the mssql extension. You’ll learn how to use the commands and shortcuts, how connection profiles and passwords are stored and even how to create a handy shortcut for getting mssql started.

  • mssql’s Commands and Execution Engine
  • Connecting to LocalDB While Learning More About mssql Connections
  • Connecting to Azure SQL from Windows and macOS
  • Demonstrating How mssql Securely Stores Your Passwords
  • Using ADO.NET Connection Strings to Connect
  • Connecting to the Database in the Docker Container
  • Connection Keyboard and Status Bar Shortcuts
  • Creating a Keyboard Shortcut to Start up mssql and Connect

Module 4 : Learning the mssql Basics to Connect, Query and Create

In this module you’ll start interacting with the database, executing queries and commands, and exploring  result sets. You’ll learn about the snippets and also learn about attaching to existing database files and creating new databases from scratch. Most importantly  you’ll learn about the great SQL editor and result view support that the mssql extension brings to you.

  • Attaching an Existing Database File
  • Interacting with the Results of Your First Query
  • The Intelligent Editor Window
  • Using Snippets to Speed Up Command Building
  • Exploring Multiple Result Sets Further
  • Using Snippets to See Database Metadata
  • Creating Databases, Tables and Data

Module 5: Leveraging Advanced Tips & Tricks

This module will dig deeper into mssql and provide tips that take advantage not just of mssql features, but also capabilities of Visual Studio Code to make using mssql easier.

  • Exporting Results to CSV, JSON or Excel
  • Localization of mssql’s Messages
  • Controlling Behavior Through VS Code’s Settings
  • Formatting Code in the Editor Window
  • Results Window Tricks, Shortcuts & Settings
  • Checking Out the Last Few Settings
  • Creating Your Own SQL Snippets in VS Code
  • Looking Ahead to Integrated Authentication on Mac and Linux

EF Core CLI Commands with VS2017 RC3

Visual Studio 2017 RC3 was released yesterday but unfortunately an install issue has take it back off the shelf for a brief period. Watch this space for the return of RC3!

But I did manage to get it installed and wanted to show you that the EF Core CLI commands are now working. If you’ve been playing with VS2017 RC and EF Core you may have run into the problem that the EF Core tooling package was not in sync yet with the MSBuild tooling for .NET Core. That’s fixed now and not only does it work but there’s a change that I’m really happy to see.

As always, I have my dbcontext in its own project. Here are the csproj contents for that project:

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Notice that the DotNetCliToolReference is pointing to Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Tools.DotNet . The dotnet and PowerShell commands are exposed in separate packages. With “.DotNet” is the package that has the CLI commands. Without “.DotNet” is the package that contains the PowerShell commands.

More importantly, the package version went from “1.1.0-preview4” to “1.0.0-msbuild3-final”. I can’t explain why we went from 1.1.0 down to 1.0.0 but this is the newer and correct package.

With that in place,  I then open up a command prompt. I can use a regular one but I’m using a PowerShell command for a single benefit…that I can shorten the prompt. Here’s the command I did to trim most but not all of the path:

Quora: How do I get just the current folder name in my Windows Powershell prompt function?

Remember that I’m pointed to the path of a class library. DotNet EF requires you to point to a path containing an executable in order to run the commands. However with the latest bits, you can get HELP without having to point to the executable. Thank you Brice Lambson. It was a little meta to have to figure that out because rather than just getting help from the command, you had to googlebing for help on how to get help. So here are a simple dotnet ef command to get top level dotnet ef help, followed by dotnet ef dbcontext to get help on the dbcontext sub-commands.

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To run commands that depend on the APIs, you still have to point to a startup-project if you are running the commands from a class library. Here I’ve run the command to list the migrations in my project. I’ve only got one, sqlite-init.

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Visual Studio Code Snippets to Make Coding EF Core a Little Simpler

I’ve been using the user snippet feature of Visual Studio Code to make it easier to get some of the code I commonly use for EF Core into my files. For example I have C# snippets for DbContext to create a constructor overload that takes in a DbContextOptions parameter, OnConfiguring or OnModeling . I have json snippets to add in the EFCore Commands dependency and the Tools section with EF Core tools.

github.com/julielerman/EFCoreSnippetsForVSCode

I finally created a github repository to share them. Since you’ll need to add the csharp snippets into your existing csharp snippets and the same with the json, i have put them into separate csharp.json and json.json files from which you can copy and past my snippets into your own.

Although the instructions are on the user defined snippets page I just linked to, the TL;DR is:

From menu, choose Code, Preferences then User Snippets

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That will open a list of snippet files. Choose C# for the C# snippets and Json for the Json snippets. Paste in my snippets!

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